Liver Function

A new virus in liver cancer

More than a cause of a simple infection, viruses are often involved in the development of serious diseases. Such is the case with liver cancer, which often develops in an organ that has been weakened by hepatitis B or C virus. ...

Aug 27, 2015
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Drug sharply lowers cholesterol in animal tests

An Arizona drug company will patent a small peptide—developed through research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham—that shows significant ability to lower blood cholesterol in animal models. Capstone Therapeutics ...

Aug 07, 2015
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Researchers identify new vitamin B3 pathway

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have identified a new vitamin B3 pathway that regulates liver metabolism. The discovery provides an opportunity to pursue the development of novel drug therapies ...

Aug 06, 2015
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Liver function tests (LFTs or LFs), are groups of clinical biochemistry laboratory blood assays designed to give information about the state of a patient's liver. The parameters measured include PT/INR, aPTT, albumin, billirubin (direct and indirect) and others. According to some, liver transaminases (AST/ALT (SGOT/SGPT) are not liver function tests, but are biomarkers of liver injury in a patient with some degree of intact liver function.[citation needed] Other sources include transaminases. Most liver diseases cause only mild symptoms initially, but it is vital that these diseases be detected early. Hepatic (liver) involvement in some diseases can be of crucial importance. This testing is performed by a medical technologist on a patient's serum or plasma sample obtained by phlebotomy. Some tests are associated with functionality (e.g., albumin); some with cellular integrity (e.g., transaminase) and some with conditions linked to the biliary tract (gamma-glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase). Several biochemical tests are useful in the evaluation and management of patients with hepatic dysfunction. These tests can be used to (1) detect the presence of liver disease, (2) distinguish among different types of liver disorders, (3) gauge the extent of known liver damage, and (4) follow the response to treatment. Some or all of these measurements are also carried out (usually about twice a year for routine cases) on those individuals taking certain medications- anticonvulsants are a notable example- in order to ensure that the medications are not damaging the person's liver.

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