Low Birth Weight

Parents urged to be safer with baby slings

With three deaths in Australia associated with baby slings and a new QUT study finding almost one in 20 infants have been injured or narrowly avoided injury in slings, researchers are working with the Office ...

Mar 25, 2014
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Mum's genes work with baby's to prevent obesity

It's long been known that babies who have a low birth weight have an increased risk of diabetes and obesity in later life. This developmental programming can be influenced by environmental factors, but little ...

Mar 04, 2014
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Low birth weight reduces ability to metabolize drugs

Researchers have identified another concern related to low birth weight – a difference in how the body reacts to drugs, which may last a person's entire life and further complicate treatment of illnesses or diseases that ...

Feb 27, 2014
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Making lab-grown tissues stronger

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