Measles

Support, not punishment, the best way to boost vaccination

Immunisation in Australia isn't compulsory - and doesn't need to be controversial. Most Australians recognise the incredible benefits that vaccination provides to prevent serious disease; we have high and stable coverage rates of around 93%. ...

7 hours ago
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US health officials perplexed by vaccination skeptics

Public health officials in the U.S. are exasperated by their inability to persuade more parents to vaccinate their children, saying they're dealing with a small minority who are misinformed—or merely obstinate—about ...

21 hours ago
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Vaccine skeptics aren't swayed by emotional scare tactics

On the heels of a nationwide measles outbreak comes a report that campaigns aimed at scaring people about the consequences of non-vaccination might not be as effective as many think. An upcoming article in the journal Communication Re ...

Mar 03, 2015
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Seth Mnookin on vaccination and public health

Seth Mnookin, an assistant professor of science writing and associate director of MIT's Graduate Program in Science Writing, is the author of "The Panic Virus: The True Story Behind the Vaccine-Autism Controversy" ...

Mar 02, 2015
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Increased risk from toxoplasmosis

A third of all humans carry the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis—a disease commonly associated with cats, HIV-AIDS patients and pregnant women—with scientists long believing healthy immune systems control the parasite ...

Feb 25, 2015
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Measles, also known as rubeola or morbilli, is an infection of the respiratory system caused by a virus, specifically a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus. Morbilliviruses, like other paramyxoviruses, are enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA viruses. Symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose, red eyes and a generalized, maculopapular, erythematous rash.

Measles (also sometimes known as English Measles) is spread through respiration (contact with fluids from an infected person's nose and mouth, either directly or through aerosol transmission), and is highly contagious—90% of people without immunity sharing living space with an infected person will catch it. An asymptomatic incubation period occurs nine to twelve days from initial exposure and infectivity lasts from two to four days prior, until two to five days following the onset of the rash (i.e. four to nine days infectivity in total).

An alternative name for measles in English-speaking countries is rubeola, which is sometimes confused with rubella (German measles); the diseases are unrelated.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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