Peripheral Vascular Disease

Long-term post-CABG mortality increased with diabetes

(HealthDay)—Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have increased long-term risk of death after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), with higher risk among those with T1DM, ...

Apr 30, 2015
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Peripheral vascular disease (PVD), commonly referred to as peripheral arterial disease (PAD) or peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD), refers to the obstruction of large arteries not within the coronary, aortic arch vasculature, or brain. PVD can result from atherosclerosis, inflammatory processes leading to stenosis, an embolism, or thrombus formation. It causes either acute or chronic ischemia (lack of blood supply). Often PAD is a term used to refer to atherosclerotic blockages found in the lower extremity.

PVD also includes a subset of diseases classified as microvascular diseases resulting from episodal narrowing of the arteries (Raynaud's phenomenon), or widening thereof (erythromelalgia), i.e. vascular spasms.

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