Postnatal Depression

Neuroscience 'used and abused'

Influential policy-informing 'evidence' that children's brains are irreversibly 'sculpted' by parental care is based on questionable evidence.

Mar 19, 2014
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Listening matters for mothers

For most women, childbirth is an intense experience, culminating in the joy of delivering a newborn, swaddled and sweet, resting in the mother's arms within hours. Yet for those who deliver their babies prematurely, ...

Oct 01, 2013
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Tired, moody and pregnant? Exercise may be the answer

Exercise may improve the mood of pregnant women and help to reduce levels of fatigue reports new research published in Psychology & Health. The study, by Anca Gaston and Harry Prapavessis at the University of Western Ontari ...

Aug 02, 2013
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Domestic violence and perinatal mental health

Women who have mental health disorders around the time of birth are more likely to have previously experienced domestic violence, according to a study by UK researchers published in this week's PLOS Medicine.

May 28, 2013
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Postpartum anxiety more common than depression

(HealthDay)—Postpartum anxiety is more common than depression in the days and months following delivery, and is associated with adverse maternal heath outcomes and reduced duration of breastfeeding, according ...

Mar 04, 2013
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Postpartum depression (PPD), also called postnatal depression, is a form of clinical depression which can affect women, and less frequently men, typically after childbirth. Studies report prevalence rates among women from 5% to 25%, but methodological differences among the studies make the actual prevalence rate unclear. Among men, in particular new fathers, the incidence of postpartum depression has been estimated to be between 1.2% and 25.5%. Postpartum depression occurs in women after they have carried a child, usually in the first few months, and may last up to several months or even a year. Specifically, the onset of postpartum depression begins within 4 weeks and lasting up to 6 months after giving birth. Symptoms include sadness, fatigue, changes in sleeping and eating patterns, reduced libido, crying episodes, anxiety, and irritability. Although a number of risk factors have been identified, the causes of PPD are not well understood. Many women recover with a treatment consisting of a support group or counseling.

The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, a standardized self-reported questionnaire, may be used to identify women who have postpartum depression.

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