Premature Aging

Kids are at risk for sun damage during spring break

As families prepare to escape the winter weather for somewhere warmer this spring break, they should exercise caution when exposing their skin to the sun after a long winter indoors. Loyola University Health System (LUHS) ...

Apr 02, 2014
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Protecting the skin from sun exposure

The ultraviolet radiation (UVR) present in sunlight is the most common environmental carcinogen, and long-term exposure to UVR can lead to skin cancer and premature aging of the skin. To develop better methods ...

Jan 27, 2014
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Study highlights need for better sunscreens

A low level of daily exposure to a common component of sunlight can cause skin damage at the molecular level after just a few days, new University of Michigan Medical School research shows.

Dec 04, 2013
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Study of twins shows how smoking ages the face

(HealthDay)—A study comparing the faces of identical twins confirms what many smokers fear—the habit does prematurely age a person's skin, taking a serious toll on looks even after just five years.

Oct 30, 2013
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Just two weeks in orbit causes changes in eyes

Just 13 days in space may be enough to cause profound changes in eye structure and gene expression, report researchers from Houston Methodist, NASA Johnson Space Center, and two other institutions in the ...

Oct 24, 2013
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Researchers improve diabetes monitoring

A new way of monitoring blood glucose control in diabetes is a step closer to market thanks to a partnership between researchers from the University and leading medical device company glySure Ltd.

Oct 22, 2013
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Senescence or biological aging is the change in the biology of an organism as it ages after its maturity. Such changes range from those affecting its cells and their function to those affecting the whole organism. There are a number of theories as to why senescence occurs; for example, some posit it is programmed by gene expression changes, others that it is the cumulative damage caused by biological processes. Senescence is not the inevitable fate of all organisms. A variety of organisms, including some cold-blooded animals, have negligible senescence. Whether senescence as a biological process can be slowed down, halted or even reversed, is a subject of current scientific speculation and research.

The word senescence is derived from the Latin word senex, meaning old man, old age, or advanced in age.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.

How kids' brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring ...