Sarcoma

How genetic mutations promote Ewing's sarcoma

Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have elucidated at the molecular level how an otherwise innocuous inherited mutation that is quite common in European populations interacts with a spontaneous ...

Jul 28, 2015
popularity82 comments 0

The key to stopping sarcomas' spread

When sarcomas become large enough and outgrow their blood supply, they become vulnerable to hypoxia—a lack of oxygen. That adaptation not only enables them to survive the stress of low oxygen—it also enables them to withstand ...

May 12, 2015
popularity5 comments 0

A sarcoma (from the Greek sarx (σάρκα) meaning "flesh") is a cancer that arises from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. Thus, malignant tumors made of cancerous bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, vascular, or hematopoietic tissues are, by definition, considered sarcomas. This is in contrast to a malignant tumor originating from epithelial cells, which are termed carcinoma. Sarcomas are quite rare - common malignancies, such as breast, colon, and lung cancer, are almost always carcinoma.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

Latest Spotlight News

How language gives your brain a break

Here's a quick task: Take a look at the sentences below and decide which is the most effective. (1) "John threw out the old trash sitting in the kitchen." (2) "John threw the old trash sitting in the kitchen out."

Study reveals new insight into DNA repair

DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the worst possible form of genetic malfunction that can cause cancer and resistance to therapy. New information published this week reveals more about why this occurs and how these breaks ...

New insight into how the immune system sounds the alarm

T cells are the guardians of our bodies: they constantly search for harmful invaders and diseased cells, ready to swarm and kill off any threats. A better understanding of these watchful sentries could allow scientists to ...