Sexual Functioning

Sedentary lifestyle spells more menopause misery

Sedentary middle-aged Hispanic women in Latin America have significantly worse menopause symptoms than their active counterparts, shows a study of more than 6,000 women across Latin America, which was published online today ...

Jan 27, 2016
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Sexual dysfunction—overdiagnosed or undertreated?

The difference between mild sexual difficulties and clinically diagnosable sexual dysfunction is not a new source of debate among health professionals, but it has been stirred up recently by changes to official diagnostic ...

Dec 03, 2015
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Sexual function is a model developed at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, defining different aspects of the assessment of sexual dysfunction comprises the following components.

Firstly, relevant aspects of sexual function are defined on the basis of a modified version of Masters and Johnson’s pioneer work. The aspects of sexual function defined as being relevant to the assessment include sexual desire, erection, orgasm and ejaculation.

Secondly, guidelines for assessing sexual function are suggested and divided into four stages.

Stage 1 deals with the documentation of the defined aspects of sexual function. The main questions are:

Stage 2 deals with the assessment of the frequency of different sexual activities, such as intercourse, within a given time frame. The possible explanations for an absence or a decreased frequency of sexual activities may include physiological, psychological, social, religious and ethical reasons.

Stage 3 it is estimated if or to what extent waning sexual functions and/or activities cause distress.

Stage 4, the association between the distress due to waning sexual function and well-being and emotional isolation is assessed.

These guidelines were constructed to assess male sexual function in relation with treatment for prostate cancer. However, the concept has been modified and adapted for females.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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