American Journal of Public Health

The American Journal of Public Health is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal published by the American Public Health Association covering health policy and public health. The journal was established in 1911 and its stated mission is "to advance public health research, policy, practice, and education." The journal occasionally publishes themed supplements. The editor-in-chief is Mary E. Northridge. The journal contains the following departments: The American Journal of Public Health was voted one of the 100 most influential journals in biology and medicine over the last 100 years by Special Libraries Association. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the 2009 impact factor is 4.241, ranking it second out of 95 titles in the category "Public, Environmental and Occupational Health" of the Social Sciences Edition and 9th out of 122 in the same category in the Science Edition. The journal is abstracted and indexed in Ageline, Applied Social Science Index and Abstracts, Biological Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts Service, CINAHL, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Food Science and Technology Abstracts, MEDLINE, Psychological Abstracts, PsycINFO, Science Citation Index, Scopus, and Statistical

Publisher
American Public Health Association
Country
United States
History
1911–present
Impact factor
4.371 (2009)
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Miriam Hospital study examines smoking prevalence

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have found that people with mobility impairments under age 65 have significantly higher rates of smoking than those without mobility impairments. Additionally, smokers with mobility impairments ...

Jul 11, 2014
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R.I. lead law effective, often ignored

When landlords have followed Rhode Island's law requiring them to protect tenants from exposure to lead, their compliance has significantly reduced blood levels of the toxic metal in children. But in four ...

Jul 07, 2014
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Evidence stacks up in favour of dairy

Eating higher, compared to lower, amounts of cheese, milk, yoghurt or butter does not make a person more likely to die from cardiovascular disease, cancer or any other cause, according to a systematic review ...

Jun 30, 2014
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