British Medical Journal (BMJ)

BMJ is a partially open-access peer-reviewed medical journal. Originally called the British Medical Journal, the title was officially shortened to BMJ in 1988. The journal is published by the BMJ Group, a wholly owned subsidiary of the British Medical Association. The editor in chief of BMJ is Fiona Godlee, who was appointed in February 2005. The journal began publishing on 3 October 1840 as the Provincial Medical and Surgical Journal and quickly attracted the attention of physicians around the world through its publication of high-impact original research articles and unique case reports. The BMJ s first editors were P. Hennis Green, lecturer on the diseases of children at the Hunterian School of Medicine, who also was its founder and Robert Streeten of Worcester, a member of the PMSA council. The first issue of the British Medical Journal was 16 pages long and contained three simple woodcut illustrations. The longest items were the editors introductory editorial and a report of the Provincial Medical and Surgical Association s Eastern Branch. Other pages included a condensed version of Henry Warburton s medical reform bill, book reviews, clinical papers, and case notes.

Publisher
BMJ Group
Country
United Kingdom
History
1840–present
Impact factor
13.471 (2011)
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Common antibiotic linked with heart deaths

The antibiotic clarithromycin—widely used for treating common bacterial infections—is associated with an increased risk of heart deaths, finds a study published in the BMJ today.

Aug 19, 2014
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Optimal red blood cell folate level about 1,000 nmol/L

(HealthDay)—The optimal population red blood cell folate level for prevention of neural tube defects could be defined as approximately 1,000 nmol/L, according to research published online July 29 in BMJ.

Aug 04, 2014
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Why we should vaccinate boys against HPV as well as girls

Gillian Prue, from the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Queen's University of Belfast, says that the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is common in men and can lead to genital warts and the development of some head and ...

Jul 30, 2014
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