British Medical Journal (BMJ)

BMJ is a partially open-access peer-reviewed medical journal. Originally called the British Medical Journal, the title was officially shortened to BMJ in 1988. The journal is published by the BMJ Group, a wholly owned subsidiary of the British Medical Association. The editor in chief of BMJ is Fiona Godlee, who was appointed in February 2005. The journal began publishing on 3 October 1840 as the Provincial Medical and Surgical Journal and quickly attracted the attention of physicians around the world through its publication of high-impact original research articles and unique case reports. The BMJ s first editors were P. Hennis Green, lecturer on the diseases of children at the Hunterian School of Medicine, who also was its founder and Robert Streeten of Worcester, a member of the PMSA council. The first issue of the British Medical Journal was 16 pages long and contained three simple woodcut illustrations. The longest items were the editors introductory editorial and a report of the Provincial Medical and Surgical Association s Eastern Branch. Other pages included a condensed version of Henry Warburton s medical reform bill, book reviews, clinical papers, and case notes.

Publisher
BMJ Group
Country
United Kingdom
History
1840–present
Impact factor
13.471 (2011)
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How much overdetection is acceptable in cancer screening?

People have highly variable views on how much overdetection is acceptable in cancer screening, finds a UK survey in The BMJ this week. The authors say invitations for screening "should include clear information on the li ...

19 hours ago
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Should smoking be banned in UK parks?

Lord Ara Darzi and Oliver Keown at the Institute of Global Health Innovation want a ban to help smokers quit and to protect children from seeing people lighting up.

Feb 25, 2015
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Anxiety and depression more common among smokers

While as many as one in three smokers think lighting up can relieve stress, new research shows that smokers are actually 70 per cent more likely to say they are anxious or depressed than non-smokers.

Feb 25, 2015
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