Current Biology

You can classify words in your sleep

When people practice simple word classification tasks before nodding off—knowing that a "cat" is an animal or that "flipu" isn't found in the dictionary, for example—their brains will unconsciously continue ...

Sep 11, 2014
popularity 4.8 / 5 (8) | comments 1

Learning to see better in life and baseball

With a little practice on a computer or iPad—25 minutes a day, 4 days a week, for 2 months—our brains can learn to see better, according to a study of University of California, Riverside baseball players reported in the ...

Feb 17, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (7) | comments 0

Plant used in Chinese medicine fights chronic pain

A plant used for centuries as a pain reliever in Chinese medicine may be just what the doctor ordered, especially when it comes to chronic pain. A key pain-relieving ingredient is a compound known as dehydrocorybulbine (DHCB) ...

Jan 02, 2014
popularity 4.7 / 5 (22) | comments 4 | with audio podcast

'Seeing' bodies with sound (no sight required)

People born unable to see are readily capable of learning to perceive the shape of the human body through soundscapes that translate images into sound, according to researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press ...

Mar 06, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (3) | comments 1

Tension triggers muscle building

Skeletal muscles are built from small contractile units, the sarcomeres. Many of these sarcomeres are connected in a well-ordered series to form myofibrils that span from one muscle end to the other. Contractions ...

Mar 14, 2014
popularity 3.4 / 5 (17) | comments 0

Slowing the ageing process—it's in your genes

Imagine being able to take a drug that can reduce the rate at which you age. Research by Massey University senior lecturer in genetics Dr Austen Ganley is making this dream one step closer to reality.

Sep 05, 2013
popularity 4.5 / 5 (19) | comments 3 | with audio podcast