N.J. dental students accused of cheating

May 17, 2006

New Jersey's only dental school is investigating allegations that 18 students traded or sold clinical procedure credits they need to graduate, a report said.

The New Jersey Dental School cheating scandal came to light when students who had not met their required number of clinical procedures to graduate complained about classmates' alleged wrongdoing.

"It's cheating and it's outright wrong," Dean Cecile Feldman told the Newark (N.J.) Star Ledger.

"It's not a majority of the class, but it is sizable," she said of the 18 students suspected out of 84 who are supposed to graduate Sunday.

Penalties range from repeating clinical dental work to outright dismissal, Feldman said.

The cheating scandal is the latest woe to hit the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and could cost the dental school and the university its accreditation, the newspaper reported.

The Newark university already is under a federal monitor for alleged corruption and is the focus of an ongoing criminal investigation.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Changing views of evolutionary factors at work on earliest mammals

Related Stories

Easing excruciating facial nerve pain

October 6, 2016

For more than a year, Surujdai Kalladeen suffered excruciating pain in her face that would render her unable to work or do anything for long stretches of time. After seeking help from several doctors, including a neurologist ...

Providing dental care for patients with disabilities

March 24, 2014

Dennis Fitzpatrick had 17 cavities by the time he arrived at the Rutgers School of Dental Medicine's special care center seven years ago. Fitzpatrick, 27, who suffers from cerebral palsy, had regular checkups throughout childhood, ...

Recommended for you

Brain activity may predict risk of falls in older people

December 7, 2016

Measuring the brain activity of healthy, older adults while they walk and talk at the same time may help predict their risk of falls later, according to a study published in the December 7, 2016, online issue of Neurology.

Optimism may reduce risk of dying prematurely among women

December 7, 2016

Having an optimistic outlook on life—a general expectation that good things will happen—may help people live longer, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study found that women ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.