Cola may contribute to osteoporosis

October 7, 2006

Women who drink cola four times a week may be more susceptible to osteoporosis, researchers in Massachusetts reported.

The researchers at Tufts University said there is no evidence that an occasional cola will hurt bones, but women may want to watch their intake until more studies are conducted, WebMD.com said Friday.

The study of men and women just under age 60 found that cola consumption seemed to be linked to lower bone mineral density at three hip sites in women, but not in the spine.

Men did not show a lower bone mineral density. Results were similar for diet and decaffeinated colas as well.

Men reported drinking an average of six soft drinks -- five of them colas -- each week. Women reported drinking five carbonated drinks a week, four of which were colas.

Researchers said results should be viewed cautiously because it was not determined why women who drank more cola had lower bone mineral density. However, women who drank more cola tended to consume less calcium and fruit juice, which may contribute to lower density.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Regular intake of sugary beverages, but not diet soda, is associated with prediabetes

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