New York City hospital worker had TB

March 16, 2007

Hundreds of Bronx hospital patients, including infants, and their relatives were exposed to tuberculosis by a staffer, said New York City health officials.

The Health Department is tracking down anyone treated in the maternity, baby nursery, neonatal intensive care and psychiatric units of St. Barnabas Hospital between Nov. 1, 2006 and Jan. 24.

"This health care worker has a strain that ... responds to the most common tuberculosis medications," Dr. Sonal Munsiff, assistant commissioner for TB control at the city Health Department, told the New York Daily News. "This means we can give effective treatment to exposed people to prevent them from getting active TB."

The New York Post said the Health Department and the hospital went public with its search for patients because they had not been able to reach many of them. Of 571 patients or family members initially identified and contacted by mail -- including 238 infants - only 260 have been tested, the Post reported.

Three adults and no infants have tested positive for tuberculosis exposure, but not active TB, the Post said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Marijuana may blunt bone health

Related Stories

30-day hospital readmission is a poor measure of quality

October 6, 2016

The 30-day window for hospital readmissions—used by the federal government to penalize hospitals believed to provide lower-quality care because patients return to the hospital following discharge—should be reduced to ...

Most hospital palliative care programs are understaffed

October 5, 2016

Most hospitals offer palliative care services that help people with serious illnesses manage their pain and other symptoms and make decisions about their treatment, while providing emotional support and assistance in navigating ...

Recommended for you

Zika virus infection alters human and viral RNA

October 20, 2016

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that Zika virus infection leads to modifications of both viral and human genetic material. These modifications—chemical tags known as ...

Food-poisoning bacteria may be behind Crohn's disease

October 19, 2016

People who retain a particular bacterium in their gut after a bout of food poisoning may be at an increased risk of developing Crohn's disease later in life, according to a new study led by researchers at McMaster University.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.