Drug-resistant gonorrhea spreading in U.S.

April 13, 2007

U.S. health officials say doctors are running out of options for treating the rapid spread of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says data from 26 U.S. cities shows the number of resistant gonorrhea cases has jumped from less than 1 percent to more than 13 percent in less than five years, the Washington Post reported.

Doctors are being told to stop treating gonorrhea with ciprofloxacin and other antibiotics in its class, known as fluoroquinolones, and go back to using cephalosporins, an older class of drugs.

"We've lost the ability to use what had been the most reliable class of antibiotics," John M. Douglas Jr., head of the CDC's division of sexually transmitted disease prevention, told The Post.

Douglas said doctors will be powerless to treat gonorrhea if the disease becomes resistant to the remaining class of drugs.

Gonorrhea infects more than 700,000 Americans each year. If untreated, the disease can lead to sterility and potentially life-threatening complications, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: UN sets its sights on superbugs

Related Stories

UN sets its sights on superbugs

September 20, 2016

World leaders on Wednesday will for the first time tackle the growing scourge of superbacteria, which are resistant to antibiotics and are making illnesses from tuberculosis to sexually transmitted diseases increasingly ...

UN mobilizes to stop super-bugs

September 21, 2016

The United Nations on Wednesday launched a global effort to fight so-called super-bugs that resist antibiotics, warning of a mounting death toll without more research.

Gonorrhea resistant to all but one antibiotic: CDC

August 9, 2012

(HealthDay) -- With options shrinking to a single antibiotic that can fight resistant strains of gonorrhea, U.S. health authorities issued revised guidelines for treating the sexually transmitted bacteria on Thursday.

Research on gonorrhea uncovers new immune system trigger

June 11, 2015

Researchers at the University of Toronto have uncovered how Gram-negative bacteria—a broad class of bugs that cause diseases ranging from gonorrhea to diarrhea and pneumonia—can trigger a reaction from our immune system. ...

Recommended for you

Raising the curtain on cerebral malaria's deadly agents

December 6, 2016

Using state-of-the-art brain imaging technology, scientists at the National Institutes of Health filmed what happens in the brains of mice that developed cerebral malaria (CM). The results, published in PLOS Pathogens, reveal ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.