Study: Smoking bans reduce smoking

August 22, 2007

A Canadian study has determined smoking bans result in smokers either quitting or reducing their cigarette consumption.

Statistics Canada found even personal prohibitions that make homes smoke-free also are effective in reducing smoking.

The researchers found smokers residing in newly smoke-free homes or workplaces during the past decade were more likely to quit during the ensuing two years than smokers with no restrictions at home or at work.

Using data from the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey and the National Population Health Survey, researchers determined that among Canadian smokers living in homes that became "smoke-free" during the survey period, 20 percent had quit two years later. That compares with 13 percent of smokers living in homes that were not smoke-free, Statistics Canada said.

Similarly, 27 percent of smokers who initially reported no restrictions at work, but who two years later reported a complete ban, had stopped smoking. That's more than double the 13 percent among those who continued to face no restrictions at work.

The study, entitled "Smoking bans: Influence on smoking prevalence," was published Wednesday in the online edition of the journal Health Reports.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Radical new law needed to ensure the Smokefree 2025 goal

Related Stories

Nebraska town considers banning smoking in apartments

September 25, 2016

Some leaders in a blue-collar Nebraska suburb that's home to Offutt Air Force Base are borrowing an idea from a vastly more liberal state: Ban apartment renters from smoking cigarettes and e-cigarettes inside.

Recommended for you

Want to exercise more? Get yourself some competition

October 27, 2016

Imagine you're a CEO trying to get your employees to exercise. Most health incentive programs have an array of tools—pamphlets, websites, pedometers, coaching, team activities, step challenges, money—but what actually ...

Sleep loss tied to changes of the gut microbiota in humans

October 25, 2016

Results from a new clinical study conducted at Uppsala University suggest that curtailing sleep alters the abundance of bacterial gut species that have previously been linked to compromised human metabolic health. The new ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.