A further study of Helicobacter pylori reducing gastric blood flow

January 21, 2009

A research group from Sweden investigated the mechanisms underlying the reduction in gastric blood flow induced by a luminal water extract of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). They found that the H. pylori water extract reduces gastric mucosal blood flow acutely through iNOS- and nerve-mediated pathways.

Gastric mucosal blood flow has a vital role in gastric mucosal protection. A high blood flow is considered a good protection against injury, as it dilutes, neutralizes, and removes hazardous substances that have penetrated the gastric mucosal barrier. A research group in Sweden has previously found that a water extract of H. pylori reduces the mucosal blood flow in rats by a mast cell- and platelet activating factor (PAF)-dependent pathway. In this study they further investigated the mechanisms behind the reduction in blood flow in mice. This will be published on January 14, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology.

In their study, the stomachs of isoflurane-anesthetized mice were exteriorized, and the mucosal surface exposed. Blood flow was measured with the laser-Doppler technique, and systemic arterial blood pressure monitored. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to water extract produced from H. pylori strain 88-23. To investigate the role of a nerveor iNOS-mediated pathway, they used intraluminal
lidocaine and iNOS-/- mice. Blood flow response to the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) was also assessed.

They found that in wild-type mice, the water extract of H. pylori decreased mucosal blood flow by approximately 30%. This reduction was abolished in iNOS-deficient mice, and by pre-treatment with lidocaine. Luminally applied ADMA resulted in reduction in blood flow similar to that observed in wild-type mice exposed to the water extract of H. pylori.

The results indicated that H. pylori water extract reduces gastric mucosal blood flow acutely through an iNOS- and nerve-mediated pathway. This will be very importance to understand the development of gastric inflammation.

Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology

Explore further: Watermelon could lower blood pressure

Related Stories

Stanford researchers' cooling glove 'better than steroids'

August 30, 2012

(Medical Xpress)—The temperature-regulation research of Stanford biologists H. Craig Heller and Dennis Grahn has led to a device that rapidly cools body temperature, greatly improves exercise recovery, and could help explain ...

Why the calorie is broken

January 27, 2016

Calories consumed minus calories burned: it's the simple formula for weight loss or gain. But dieters often find that it doesn't work. Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley of Gastropod investigate.

Recommended for you

TET proteins drive early neurogenesis

December 7, 2016

The fate of stem cells is determined by series of choices that sequentially narrow their available options until stem cells' offspring have found their station and purpose in the body. Their decisions are guided in part by ...

New, more effective strategy for producing flu vaccines

December 5, 2016

A team of researchers led by Yoshihiro Kawaoka, professor of pathobiological sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine, has developed technology that could improve the production of vaccines ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.