Primary stroke centers more likely to be in states with certification programs

May 15, 2011

Searching public databases in 2010, researchers looked at the distribution of primary stroke centers, designated such by state health departments or national organizations (such as The Joint Commission in collaboration with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association). They found that 24 percent of acute general hospitals are certified stroke centers.

Notably, in the eight that have a state-based program that designates such hospitals, the percentage (63 percent) of certified stroke centers was higher than in states that don't (13 percent).

Stroke centers that were certified by only state programs were smaller as shown by bed numbers than those that were certified by The Joint Commission certification, researchers said.

Researchers found several factors increased the chances of a hospital being designated a certified stroke center, including: location in an , larger hospital size and the presence of a state health department stroke program.

Hospitals were less likely to be certified stroke centers if they were located in the South or West.

Researchers concluded that location of the hospital and the existence of a state stroke center certification program influenced the likelihood of a being a certified stroke center. State legislation in stroke center designation could substantially increase the number of stroke centers across the United States, researchers said.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Beyond the sweetness of sugar

June 24, 2016

We all know the nutritional "evils" of sugar as a potential cause of obesity, chronic disease and death, through to being a potentially brain damaging substance.

Dose of nature is just what the doctor ordered

June 23, 2016

People who visit parks for 30 minutes or more each week are much less likely to have high blood pressure or poor mental health than those who don't, according to new research by Australian and UK environmental scientists.

Is 'when we eat' as important as 'what we eat'?

June 21, 2016

In a review of research on the effect of meal patterns on health, the few studies available suggest that eating irregularly is linked to a higher risk of metabolic syndrome (high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and obesity). ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.