How to stay safe in extreme summer heat

Blazing temperatures can bring on serious illness if you're not careful. Dr. Abhi Mehrotra, an emergency physician at UNC Hospitals, offers tips on protecting yourself and your family against extreme heat.

Today's weather forecast for the Triangle region of North Carolina calls for a high temperature of 96 degrees.

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In addition, there is a 'Code Orange' air quality alert in effect for the Triangle area. This means that sensitive groups such as young children, the elderly, and those with should be aware of the high and limit strenuous activities when outdoors during the heat of the day.

Blazing temperatures can bring on serious illness if you're not careful. In this video Dr. Abhi Mehrotra, an at UNC Hospitals, offers tips on protecting yourself against extreme heat.

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