Examining gender disparities in injury mortality; men at exceptional risk

Men are more likely than die from injury than are women. Susan B. Sorenson, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy & Practice, has evaluated nearly 30 years of national injury mortality data and found that men are at greater risk of injury mortality throughout their lives.

A key finding in the study is that the gender disparity in is greater than the disparity among ethnic groups and across age groups.

in Injury Mortality: Consistent, Persistent, and Larger Than You’d Think,” is scheduled for publication in the American Journal of Public Health in October.

Based on data from the National Center for Health Statistics, the study looks at male-to-female ratios in injury-related deaths from 1981 to 2007 and accounts for key variables including age and ethnicity.

Sorenson found that males were more likely than females to die from injury, a pattern that spanned ethnic and age groups regardless of the cause or manner of injury. 

“In the last generation, men’s risk of unintentional and violence-related injury overall is at least two or three times that of women during each year. This information about gender differences in mortality could help to develop prevention and intervention efforts,” Sorenson said.  “In fact, gender-based risks are amenable to social change so they offer a wealth of untapped potential for effective health interventions. ”

The study reports that, from 1981 through 2007, 2.9 million and 1.1 million women died of injury. 

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Racial disparities reduced in injury related mortality

Jun 16, 2008

When it comes to injury-related deaths, the gap between black and white American youths is narrowing, according to a study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study found that between ...

Deaths from unintentional injuries increase for many groups

Sep 02, 2009

While the total mortality rate from unintentional injury increased in the U.S. by 11 percent between 1999 and 2005, far larger increases were seen in some subgroups analyzed by age, race, ethnicity and type of injury by researchers ...

Study: Age, sex affect traffic accidents

Jan 03, 2007

Understanding the differences among U.S. drivers of different sexes and various ages is critical to preventing serious injuries, researchers said.

Recommended for you

Electronic health records tied to shorter time in ER

1 hour ago

(HealthDay)—Length of emergency room stay for trauma patients is shorter with the use of electronic health records, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

CDC: Almost everyone needs a flu shot

6 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Less than half of all Americans got a flu shot last year, so U.S. health officials on Thursday urged that everyone 6 months and older get vaccinated for the coming flu season. "It's really unfortunate ...

User comments