Sledding injuries: a significant cause of hospitalizations, injuries during winter months

In new research, 30 percent of children hospitalized following a sledding injury suffered significant head injuries, and 10 percent of these children had a permanent disability. The research, presented Saturday, Oct. 15, at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition (NCE) in Boston, supports the need for helmet use and other safety precautions to prevent traumatic sledding injuries.

Researchers reviewed data on children younger than 18 who were hospitalized at a from 2003 to 2011. The 52 children included 34 boys and 18 girls with an average age of 10. The most common cause of injury was their sled hitting a tree, occurring in 63.5 percent of the cases. Thirty-seven percent (20) suffered a head injury, with 70 percent of these children admitted to the . Three children had a permanent disability including cognitive impairment, and two others required long-term hospitalized rehabilitation. Other injuries included fractures (17 children), solid organ injuries (10), (3) and (1). Nine orthopedic injuries required operative intervention, and eight patients were sent home with a cast.

Lead study author Richard Herman, MD, FAAP, said the study results support the need for public education campaigns that encourage helmet use while sledding, as well as awareness of potential dangers on a sled course.

"We've seen a large increase in severe injuries resulting from sledding over the past year," said Dr. Herman.

Provided by American Academy of Pediatrics

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New study: More than 20,000 sledding injuries each year

Aug 23, 2010

Although sledding is a popular winter pastime, it can unfortunately lead to serious injury. A new study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital found ...

The Medical Minute: March is brain injury awareness month

Mar 24, 2011

March is National Brain Injury Awareness Month. Traumatic brain injuries are disruptions or changes in the way the brain functions that occur due to a blow or jolt to the head or penetrating injuries. The severity can range ...

Recommended for you

Study reveals state of crisis in Canadian foster care system

21 hours ago

A new study of foster care in Canada led by a researcher at Western University reveals a shrinking number of foster care providers are available across the country to care for a growing number of children with increasingly ...

Researchers prove the benefits of persimmons for diet

23 hours ago

Alba Mir and Ana Domingo, researchers from the Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Valencia, under the supervision of professors Miguel de la Guardia and Maria Luisa Cervera, from the same department, ...

Hand blenders used for cooking can emit persistent chemicals

23 hours ago

Eight out of twelve tested models of hand blenders are leaking chlorinated paraffins when used according to the suppliers' instructions. This is revealed in a report from Stockholm University where researchers analyzed a ...

User comments