Anti-depressant use soars in England, linked to recession

The use of anti-depressant drugs in England has soared by 28 percent in the past three years, coinciding with the country's fall into recession and the global economic crisis, new figures showed Friday.

Prescriptions went up from just under 34 million to 43.4 million between 2007-08 and 2010-11, according to figures from the (NHS) Information Centre.

The use of anti-anxiety drugs rose by eight percent over the period, from just over six million to 6.5 million, while prescriptions for rose three percent to 10.2 million.

Experts said the increase may be due to stress around the economic crisis, which began in 2008, as well as as greater awareness of mental illness.

"For some people depression just happens, but for others it is triggered by stressful events, for example , property or bereavement," said Emer O'Neill, chief executive of campaign group Depression Alliance.

"These uncertain economic times are linked to an increase in the number of people with the illness."

According to The Independent newspaper, depression is costing the country almost £11 billion (13 billion euros, $16 billion) a year in lost earnings, demands on the state-run NHS and drug prescriptions.

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omatumr
Dec 30, 2011
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rawa1
1 / 5 (1) Dec 30, 2011
It's notoriously known, just the rich people suffer with depression, the poor people simply have no time for it. Many tourists are surprised, how happy the people appear at the poor countries.
FrankHerbert
Dec 30, 2011
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Blakut
Dec 30, 2011
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ryggesogn2
1 / 5 (1) Dec 30, 2011
Free drugs! What a deal.
"you do look glum! What you need is a gramme of soma."
kochevnik
5 / 5 (1) Dec 31, 2011
Life in England is depressing in general. The climate gives vermin a foothold. It's a former empire that sucked wealth by exploiting the colonies. The English have a self-righteousness about their exploitation that reminds me of vampires. Indeed it is the source, if not the inspiration, of those bloodsuckers. That said the women have an ability to carry a conversation about something other than themselves.