Vanderbilt study leads to simpler therapy for treating latent tuberculosis

By Carole Bartoo

Research, led by Timothy Sterling, M.D., professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, has led to an important change in CDC recommendations in the regimen for prevention of the centuries-old scourge, tuberculosis (TB). Sterling’s work is published in the Dec. 8 New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).

On Friday, Dec. 9, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) that the new regimen, which takes one-third the time of current , offers an effective treatment option for many patients at high risk for developing TB. Latent TB infections result from exposure to TB, without the contagion and illness caused by the disease itself.

Up to now, the regimen for latent TB infection was daily doses of a drug called isoniazid (INH). A total of 270 daily doses were taken over the course of nine months to eradicate the bacteria, which can lie dormant in the body for years.

The study of 8,000 patients in four countries over 10 years showed that just twelve doses, given once-weekly, of INH combined with another TB drug called rifapentine was as effective. The shorter, weekly combination therapy was safe and effective, but perhaps the most important finding was the new therapy improved compliance by at least 10 percent.

“This is a game changer. Currently less than half of the people who start the current therapy complete it. The new combination would require direct observation, but more people would complete treatment,” Sterling said.

The CDC said while cases of active TB are at an all-time low, approximately 4 percent of the U.S. population, or 11 million people, have latent TB. Active TB cases, which can be deadly to patients who have a compromised immune system, still occur in Nashville. To prevent a resurgence of active and infectious disease, the Metro Nashville Public Health Department’s Division of TB Elimination works with an average of 700 new cases of latent TB per year.

The Metro Nashville Public Health Department was one of the sites for Sterling’s study, which was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (). Other Vanderbilt investigators included Amy Kerrigan, MSN, R.N., and Alicia Wright, among others.

Sterling says continued research is important. The new treatment is not an option for all patients, and may not work well in nations where TB incidence is higher. Children under 2 were excluded from the study.

Provided by Vanderbilt Medical Center

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US urges shorter treatment for TB

Dec 08, 2011

US health authorities on Thursday urged a 12-week drug regimen for people with latent tuberculosis as an effective alternative to the current nine-month regimen which many people do not finish.

CDC: New regimen drastically shortens TB treatment

May 16, 2011

(AP) -- Health officials on Monday celebrated a faster treatment for people who have tuberculosis but aren't infectious, after investigators found a new combination of pills knocks out the disease in three months instead ...

US misses goal to wipe out TB by 2010

Mar 24, 2011

The United States last year saw a sizable drop in the number of tuberculosis cases, but missed its goal of eradicating the disease by 2010, US health officials said Thursday.

Recommended for you

Study finds acupuncture does not improve chronic knee pain

2 minutes ago

Among patients older than 50 years with moderate to severe chronic knee pain, neither laser nor needle acupuncture provided greater benefit on pain or function compared to sham laser acupuncture, according to a study in the ...

Ebola outbreak nears end in Nigeria

19 minutes ago

The Ebola outbreak in Nigeria is almost over, after an ordeal that began in July when a sick man with US-Liberian citizenship flew there from Liberia, US health authorities said Tuesday.

Diuretics in proton pump inhibitor-associated hypomagnesemia

1 hour ago

Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy is associated with hospitalization for hypomagnesemia, particularly among patients also receiving diuretics, according to research published this week in PLOS Medicine. The study, conduc ...

Families wait in agony for word on Ebola patients

7 hours ago

First the ring tone echoed outside the barbed-wire-topped walls of the Ebola clinic. Then came the wails of grief, as news spread that 31-year-old Rose Johnson was dead just days after she was brought here ...

User comments