Blogging eases transition to motherhood, study shows

January 9, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- Even for well-prepared couples, the transition to parenthood can be downright stressful.

Now a study offers some encouraging news: Blogging may be helping new moms.

Based on research with 157 first-time mothers, former BYU student Brandon McDaniel and his two faculty mentors found that blogging was related to lower parenting stress and .

“Much more research is needed to come up with conclusive evidence, but at least for now it appears that first-time mothers who participate in blogging show greater levels of connection with family and friends, increased feelings of support, and more positive outcomes overall,” McDaniel said.

The new study will appear in a forthcoming issue of the Maternal and Child Health Journal. Fittingly, his wife runs a craft blog called “Patches of Pink” that served as a creative outlet and a way to connect with other moms following the birth of the McDaniel’s child.

All of the new moms in the study had Internet access at home, and half of the mothers were employed. While the researchers found that benefited from blogging in several different ways, each benefit appeared to flow through increased feelings of social support.

“Social support is one of those ‘Golden Variables’ that positively influence many other measures of well-being, including relationship satisfaction, stress levels and mental health,” said Erin Holmes, a professor of family life at BYU who co-authored the study with McDaniel.

The study authors caution that the study results are exploratory in nature. For example, it’s possible that women with stronger relationships have a greater tendency to blog.

“Even if this were the case, we hypothesize that blogging or reaching out to extended family and friends would reciprocally increase their perceptions of social support, as social support has been linked by prior research to a variety of maternal well-being outcomes,” the authors wrote.

These days the McDaniel family is based in Pennsylvania while Brandon pursues a Ph.D. in human development and studies from Penn State.

“This and other projects opened up so many doors for me,” said McDaniel, noting that he got accepted to every grad school on his wish list. “Really becoming involved in research as an undergraduate student – not just superficially involved – acted as a springboard for my career.”

Explore further: Mums are heading back to work sooner and it is stressing them out

Related Stories

Study researches birth satisfaction for first time mothers

September 16, 2011

A pilot University of Otago study investigating factors that contribute to birth satisfaction for first time New Zealand mothers has led to a bigger nationwide study examining how birth preparation impacts on birth satisfaction.

Recommended for you

Serious research into what makes us laugh

November 24, 2015

More complex jokes tend to be funnier but only up to a point, Oxford researchers have found. Jokes that are too complicated tend to lose the audience.

Psychologists dispute continuum theory of sexual orientation

November 19, 2015

Washington State University researchers have established a categorical distinction between people who are heterosexual and those who are not. By analyzing the reported sexual behavior, identity and attraction of more than ...

Babies have logical reasoning before age one, study finds

November 18, 2015

Human infants are capable of deductive problem solving as early as 10 months of age, a new study by psychologists at Emory University and Bucknell finds. The journal Developmental Science is publishing the research, showing ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.