Automatic suspension of insulin delivery via insulin pumps reduces hypoglycemia

February 9, 2012

An automated on/off feature built into insulin pump systems can suspend insulin delivery when it detects low blood glucose levels (via continuous glucose monitoring), significantly reducing the severity and duration of hypoglycemia in individuals with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.

In the study, Satish Garg, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics and Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Denver, and colleagues from the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes (Aurora, CO), Rainier Clinical Research Center (Renten, WA), AMCR Institute, Inc. (Escondido, CA), Stanford University Medical Center (CA), Mills-Peninsula Health Services (San Mateo, CA), and Medtronic Inc. (Northridge, CA) used a regimen of fasting and exercise to induce hypoglycemia in a group of subjects with type 1 diabetes who use insulin pump delivery devices along with continuous .

They compared the severity and duration of hypoglycemia and the risk of rebound hyperglycemia when the automated "low glucose suspend" feature of the pump was turned on or off. They report their findings in the article "Reduction in Duration of Hypoglycemia by Automatic Suspension of : The In-Clinic ASPIRE Study."

"This is the first randomized cross-over trial with an attempt to develop an artificial pancreas," says Dr. Garg.

Explore further: Safer and more effective diabetes control with basal insulin analogs

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Ebola virus mutations may help it evade drug treatment

September 11, 2015

Genetic mutations called "escape variants" in the deadly Ebola virus appear to block the ability of antibody-based treatments to ward off infection, according to a team of U.S. Army scientists and collaborators. Their findings, ...

Study finds viral protein that causes dengue shock

September 9, 2015

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have identified a key culprit responsible for the fluid loss and resulting shock that are the hallmark of severe - and potentially fatal - dengue virus infections.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.