Students develop a novel way to teach interdisciplinary care

Medical students pose with their board game "Circles of Care" which they developed as an educational tool for students who may end up in interprofessional health teams. Credit: Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University

A unique board game developed by a group of medical students at Western University will help bridge gaps between various health disciplines to better educate students about their roles in interdisciplinary health teams.

Students at Western's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry began developing the as part of a second year ethics project, and now it's been professionally reproduced for use in healthcare faculties at universities across Canada.

"We wanted to develop something creative that could be integrated into the curricula of all undergraduate and graduate healthcare programs, from audiology to personal support work, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and all the way to the different medical specialties," said Sarit Khimdas, a fourth year medical student at Schulich.

Khimdas and his classmates, Akshay Shetty, Chandheeb Rajakumar, Colin Meyer-Macaulay, Cal Shapiro, Rachit Sheshgiri and Neeraj Patel, used a case-based approach to create a game that would provide a realistic look at how different allied health professionals approach various aspects of patient care. The game, called 'Circles of Care,' can be played by four to eight players and ideally would be played by a group of people each from different healthcare programs.

"It provides the opportunity to learn together by discussing what our individual roles are in the healthcare team," Khimdas said. The game is currently being translated into French, and digital applications for tablet devices are also being explored.

A paper on their work has been published in the Journal of Interprofessional .

Provided by University of Western Ontario

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Choking game prevalent among teens in Texas

Jan 18, 2012

Nearly one out of seven college students surveyed at a Texas university has participated in the Choking Game, a dangerous behavior where blood flow is deliberately cut off to the brain in order to achieve a high, according ...

Recommended for you

Keeping that weight loss resolution

2 hours ago

(HealthDay)—If you're one of the many Americans who plan to lose weight next year, there are a number of things you can do to improve your chances of success, an expert says.

A case for treating both mind and body

10 hours ago

New research from Rutgers University lends more support to the idea that integrating treatment of mind and body could lead to better - and cheaper - medical care.

Pregnant woman taken off life support in Ireland

Dec 26, 2014

A brain-dead pregnant woman was taken off life support Friday after a court ruled that her 18-week-old fetus was doomed to die—a case that exposed fear and confusion among doctors over how to apply Ireland's ...

'Tis the season to overeat

Dec 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Overeating is common during the holidays, but there are strategies that can help you eat in moderation, an expert says.

Don't let burns mar your holidays

Dec 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—The risk of burns from fires and cooking accidents increases during the holidays, so you need to be extra cautious, an expert says.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.