Maternal caffeine intake doesn't affect infant sleep: study

Maternal caffeine intake doesn't affect infant sleep
Heavy caffeine consumption by nursing mothers does not increase the number of nighttime awakenings in 3-month-old infants, according to a study published online April 2 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay) -- Heavy caffeine consumption by nursing mothers does not increase the number of nighttime awakenings in 3-month-old infants, according to a study published online April 2 in Pediatrics.

Iná S. Santos, M.D., Ph.D., of the Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil, and colleagues interviewed mothers of all babies born in Pelotas in 2004, at delivery and after three months. Heavy was defined as ≥300 mg/day. Infant sleeping pattern in the previous 15 days was obtained from a subsample (885 of 4,231). Night waking was defined as an episode of infant arousal that woke the parents during nighttime.

The researchers found that 20 percent of mothers were heavy consumers of during pregnancy and 14.3 percent were heavy consumers at three months postpartum. Prevalence of frequent nighttime awakeners (more than three episodes per night) was 13.8 percent. The highest prevalence ratio (PR), though still nonsignificant, was observed among breastfed infants from mothers who were heavy consumers of caffeine during the whole pregnancy and in the postpartum period (PR, 1.65; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.86 to 3.17).

"Caffeine consumption during pregnancy and by nursing mothers seems not to have consequences on sleep of infants at the age of 3 months," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Sleep disruption for breastfed babies is temporary

Oct 17, 2011

While breastfed babies initially awaken more during the night for feedings, their sleep patterns -- falling asleep, staying asleep and total sleep time -- stabilize in later infancy and become comparable to non-breastfed ...

Poor sleep quality linked to postpartum depression

Dec 10, 2008

Postpartum depression (PPD) can lead to poor sleep quality, recent research shows. A study published in the current issue of the Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing shows that depression symptoms worsen ...

Recommended for you

Mums trust mums on the net, according to study

3 minutes ago

Facebook groups for mothers are overtaking the traditional mums-and-bubs and playgroup environments as a source of trusted advice, and offers a largely untapped marketing tool for businesses wanting to sell ...

Social networks key to improving health in New Zealand

23 minutes ago

Turning conventional thinking about health and healthcare on its head by championing social networks is vital if New Zealanders want to improve their health outcomes, and ultimately save the nation money, says a leading public ...

User comments