Radiologists play key role in successful bariatric procedures

April 29, 2012

With the increase of obesity in the last 50 years, bariatric surgeries are becoming a common solution for tackling this epidemic. A new exhibit shows how radiologists play a key role in ensuring the success of these procedures.

"Although complications are generally rare with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and gastric banding procedures, it's critical for radiologists to be familiar with both the normal presentations and possible complications for these ," said Dr. Mariam Moshiri, lead author for this presentation.

Dr. Moshiri and her co-authors at the University of Washington Medical Center image a wide range of bariatric patients including pre- and post-operative examinations, as well as studies for corrective and older bariatric procedures. "Many bariatric patients have a fluoroscopic exam the day after their surgery to document the baseline and to ensure that there are no post-operative complications. So it's important for us to understand what we need to relay to our surgical colleagues so that they can take the next step."

During their exhibit, Dr. Moshiri and her colleagues will show various surgical techniques related to bariatric surgery and the latest advances in fluoroscopy, CT, and for evaluating post-operative patients. "There are radiologists in the community who are not familiar with bariatric surgery," Dr. Moshiri said. "As the rate of surgical treatment for continues to increase, I believe radiologists will encounter these patients more frequently. For the radiologists who do not encounter these patients on a daily basis, they should at least be familiar with gastric banding and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and the appearance of normal anatomy and what complications can occur. For who work in referral centers, they should also be familiar with the less common and the older bariatric procedures they may encounter."

The study will be presented on April 28. 2012 at the ARRS Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada.

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