PUFA formula supplementation doesn't up infant cognition

PUFA formula supplementation doesn't up infant cognition

(HealthDay) -- Supplementation of infant formula with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) is not associated with improved cognition; and infants fed with milk- or soy protein-based formula have similar cognitive development scores, which are slightly lower than those of breastfed infants, according to two studies published online May 28 in Pediatrics.

Ahmad Qawasmi, M.D., from Yale University in New Haven, Conn., and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the efficacy of LCPUFA supplementation of infant formula on early in 12 trials involving 1,802 infants. The researchers found that LCPUFA supplementation had no significant impact on . In secondary analysis there was no significant effect of dosing or prematurity status on the efficacy of supplementation.

Aline Andres, Ph.D., from the Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center in Little Rock, and colleagues characterized the developmental status of 391 healthy infants who were breastfed, milk-based formula-fed (MF), or soy protein-based formula-fed (SF) during the first year of life. The researchers found that there were no differences between the MF and SF infants. On the Mental Developmental Index score at 6 and 12 months, scored slightly higher than formula-fed infants. Breastfed infants also had slightly higher Psychomotor Development Index and Preschool Language Scale-3 scores.

"In this unique study, we established that SF infants perform within normal limits and similarly to MF infants in the areas of mental, psychomotor, and language development," Andres and colleagues conclude. "Our results also suggest a slight potential advantage of cognitive development for breastfed infants."

One author of the Andres study is on the Science Advisory Board of the Soy Nutrition Institute.

More information: Abstract - Andres
Abstract - Qawasmi
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Early nutrition has a long-term metabolic impact

May 02, 2011

Nutrition during the first days or weeks of life may have long-term consequences on health, potentially via a phenomenon known as the metabolic programming effect, according to a study to be presented Monday, May 2, at the ...

Sleep disruption for breastfed babies is temporary

Oct 17, 2011

While breastfed babies initially awaken more during the night for feedings, their sleep patterns -- falling asleep, staying asleep and total sleep time -- stabilize in later infancy and become comparable to non-breastfed ...

Anxious parents misdiagnose milk formula intolerance

Jun 19, 2009

Some parents may be unnecessarily switching infant milk formulas for their healthy infants. A study published in BioMed Central's open access Nutrition Journal, found that many parents misinterpret common baby behaviors as mil ...

Recommended for you

Want kids to eat better? Get them cooking

15 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Getting kids involved in the kitchen, through cooking classes or at home, may make them more likely to choose healthy foods, according to a recent review.

Life-saving promise in simple steps

20 hours ago

The debate over the best time to clamp a baby's umbilical cord has been around forever. In about 350 BCE, Aristotle, reputedly the world's first genuine scientist, advocated delaying clamping until placenta ...

PCV13 recommended for 6- to 18-year-olds at high risk

Nov 26, 2014

(HealthDay)—Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 (PCV13) should be administered to certain children aged 6 through 18 years who are at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), according to a policy ...

Brain abnormality found in group of SIDS cases

Nov 25, 2014

More than 40 percent of infants in a group who died of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) were found to have an abnormality in a key part of the brain, researchers report. The abnormality affects the hippocampus, ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.