How blogging is revolutionizing dying

How blogging is revolutionising dying

Terminally ill people writing blogs about their condition are helping others come to terms with death according to our latest research.

Professor Tony Walter, director of the Centre for Death & Society at the University, has been looking at how the internet has changed the way we die and mourn.

It’s just one of the issues being discussed at the centre’s ‘Dying in the Digital Age’ conference being held at the Bath Royal Literary Society in Queen’s Square tomorrow (9 June).

Professor Walter said: “The internet has changed the way we die in a lot of ways. It can remove the isolation for as they come to the end of their lives.

“There is a growing trend of terminally ill people blogs and biographies. When writing a blog they find people with the same condition and immediately they acquire an informal support group.

“People find themselves connecting with others in the most remarkable ways.”

He added: “There have also been instances of doctors reading their patients’ and beginning to understand better than ever before what it is like to be the patient.”

Professor Walter examines this phenomena in his recently published paper "Does the Internet Change How We Die and Mourn?"

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cell survival protein research reveals surprise structure

Oct 14, 2011

Researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute have found a structural surprise in a type of protein that encourages cell survival, raising interesting questions about how the proteins function to influence ...

Recommended for you

Exploring 3-D printing to make organs for transplants

Jul 30, 2014

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients ...

High frequency of potential entrapment gaps in hospital beds

Jul 30, 2014

A survey of beds within a large teaching hospital in Ireland has shown than many of them did not comply with dimensional standards put in place to minimise the risk of entrapment. The report, published online in the journal ...

Key element of CPR missing from guidelines

Jul 29, 2014

Removing the head tilt/chin lift component of rescue breaths from the latest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines could be a mistake, according to Queen's University professor Anthony Ho.

Burnout impacts transplant surgeons (w/ Video)

Jul 28, 2014

Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40% feel emotionally exhausted, according to a new national study on transplant surgeon ...

User comments