Study detects 'chemobrain' in EEG activity

A Cleveland Clinic study has detected significant changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG) brain activity patterns of patients receiving chemotherapy.

The study may give scientific evidence of a condition commonly referred to as "chemobrain" – the fogginess that many patients experience while on chemotherapy. Patients with chemobrain often report short-term memory problems and difficulty concentrating.

"The EEG study demonstrated a higher amplitude, or more brain activity in women, during that particularly went up after doing a cognitive task and also after doing a physical task," said Halle Moore, M.D., a staff physician in Cleveland Clinic's solid tumor oncology unit.

The year-long study involved eight pairs of patients undergoing treatment for breast cancer.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Potential remedy for the 'mental fog' in cancer patients

Sep 04, 2008

Cancer patients have complained for years about the mental fog known as chemobrain. Now in animal studies at West Virginia University (WVU), researchers have discovered that injections of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, ...

Chemotherapy alters brain tissue in breast cancer patients

Sep 29, 2010

Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center have published the first report using imaging to show that changes in brain tissue can occur in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Chemobrain -- the flip side of surviving cancer

Sep 17, 2009

One of the most problematic side effects of cancer treatment, chemobrain - a range of symptoms including memory loss, inability to concentrate, difficulty thinking and other subtle cognitive changes following chemotherapy ...

Recommended for you

Generation of tanners see spike in deadly melanoma

11 hours ago

(AP)—Stop sunbathing and using indoor tanning beds, the acting U.S. surgeon general warned in a report released Tuesday that cites an alarming 200 percent jump in deadly melanoma cases since 1973.

Penn team makes cancer glow to improve surgical outcomes

11 hours ago

The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence.

Cancer: Tumors absorb sugar for mobility

23 hours ago

Cancer cells are gluttons. We have long known that they monopolize large amounts of sugar. More recently, it became clear that some tumor cells are also characterized by a series of features such as mobility or unlikeliness ...

User comments