Yale biologist peers into inner working of the cell

June 7, 2012

Daniel Colón-Ramos, assistant professor of cell biology, studies the C. elegans nematode, and uses the latest microscopy technology to watch neurons locate a target and form precise synaptic connections, resulting in the neural circuits that underlie human behavior.

The C. elegans system allows Colón-Ramos to visualize synapse development in vivo with single-cell resolution. The work from the Colón-Ramos lab has been recognized by a number of awards, including the Sloan Research Fellowship which is given to early-career scientists and scholars of "outstanding promise."

In this talk at a TEDx event in San Juan in November, Colón-Ramos discusses "The Value of Basic Research in Medicine."

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