Focus on quality ups newborn screening follow-up

Focus on quality ups newborn screening follow-up
Primary care pediatric practices can improve short-term newborn screening follow-up through quality-improvement processes, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay) -- Primary care pediatric practices can improve short-term newborn screening (NBS) follow-up through quality-improvement processes, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in Pediatrics.

Cynthia F. Hinton, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the U.S. in Atlanta, and colleagues surveyed 15 primary care to evaluate office systems related to NBS. A chart audit was completed. Practices were trained in quality-improvement methods, and monthly chart audits were performed to assess change over six months.

The researchers found that, at baseline, almost half of practices completed assessment of infants for NBS and, after six months, 80 percent of practices completed assessment of all infants. All in-range results were documented and shared with by two practices at baseline. By completion, 10 of 15 practices documented and shared in-range results for ≥70 percent of infants. There was an increase in use of the American College of Medical Genetics ACTion sheets, a decision support tool, from one practice at baseline to seven of 15 practices at completion.

"Practices were successful in improving NBS processes, including assessment, documentation, and communication with families," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Obese teens in study less likely to use contraception

date Jul 01, 2015

A study of nearly 1,000 teens found that sexually active obese adolescents were significantly less likely to use contraception than normal weight peers, putting them at higher risk of unintended pregnancy.

Extracurricular sports produce disciplined preteens

date Jul 01, 2015

Regular, structured extracurricular sports seem to help kids develop the discipline they need in order to engage effectively in the classroom, according to a new study led by Linda Pagani of the University ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.