Psyllium reduces metabolic syndrome risk factors

Psyllium reduces metabolic syndrome risk factors
Consumption of the fiber supplement psyllium correlates with reductions in risk factors for metabolic syndrome, according to a study published online Aug. 5 in Obesity Reviews.

(HealthDay) -- Consumption of the fiber supplement psyllium correlates with reductions in risk factors for metabolic syndrome, according to a study published online Aug. 5 in Obesity Reviews.

Sebely Pal, Ph.D., and Simone Radavelli-Bagatini, from Curtin University in Perth, Australia, reviewed the literature published from 1980 to 2012 to examine the effect of psyllium on risk factors for metabolic syndrome.

The researchers found that consumption of psyllium conferred benefits to several components of metabolic syndrome, including improved , insulin response, and blood pressure, and improved in humans and animals. In most studies, after consumption of psyllium, appetite was reported to decrease.

"Collectively, psyllium supplementation could be promoted to patients who present metabolic syndrome risk factors, such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hyperglycemia," the authors write. "It may also play a role in controlling body weight, , appetite, and hypertension, but further investigation is still required."

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