Lab tests show woman contracted plague from cat

September 15, 2012 by Steven Dubois

(AP)—Oregon health officials say a woman who tried to help her friend save the life of a choking cat also contracted the plague from the disease-stricken feline.

The woman who asked not to be identified has recovered since contracting the disease over the summer. She was treated after showing early symptoms.

The woman was bitten at the same time as Paul Gaylord, who made headlines in June when he almost died from a version of the infection that killed millions in the . The disease is now extremely rare.

The two had found a stray cat in distress, choking on a mouse. They were bitten when they tried unsuccessfully to help the animal.

Karen Yeargain of the Crook County Health Department said Friday recent lab results confirmed she had the .

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not rated yet Sep 15, 2012
So the headline should read, "Plague-stricken cat killed by mouse" :)

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