Study examines prevalence of local allergic rhinitis

September 25, 2012
Study examines prevalence of local allergic rhinitis
Local allergic rhinitis is prevalent among patients with rhinitis, affecting about one in four, and is often associated with childhood onset and persistent, severe conjunctivitis and/or asthma, according to a study published in the October issue of Allergy.

(HealthDay)—Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) is prevalent among patients with rhinitis, affecting about one in four, and is often associated with childhood onset and persistent, severe conjunctivitis and/or asthma, according to a study published in the October issue of Allergy.

To examine the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and severity of LAR, Carmen Rondón, M.D., of the Hospital Civil in Malaga, Spain, and colleagues conducted a study involving 452 with rhinitis who completed a clinical questionnaire, skin prick test, spirometry, and serum total and specific immunoglobulin E .

Of the 428 patients who completed the study, the researchers found that 25.7 percent were diagnosed with LAR, 63.1 percent had classical AR, and 11.2 percent had nonallergic rhinitis. More than 36 percent of LAR patients had childhood onset of rhinitis and 37.3 percent were sensitized to aeroallergens, especially Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. The profiles of patients with LAR and AR were similar, with most patients presenting as nonsmoking females with severe, persistent perennial rhinitis often associated with asthma and .

"In summary, our study shows that LAR is a prevalent entity in young people, affecting one in four of the rhinitis patients evaluated, with a similar clinical phenotype to AR, frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma, and with a common onset of nasal symptoms in childhood," the authors write. "Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus was the most prevalent sensitizing aeroallergen in LAR and AR patients."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Perceived stress linked to asthma, atopic disorders

September 21, 2012

(HealthDay)—Perceived stress correlates with an increased risk of adult-onset asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis as well as asthma medication use, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Allergy.

Recommended for you

New insight into how the immune system sounds the alarm

August 3, 2015

T cells are the guardians of our bodies: they constantly search for harmful invaders and diseased cells, ready to swarm and kill off any threats. A better understanding of these watchful sentries could allow scientists to ...

How to become a T follicular helper cell

July 30, 2015

Follicular helper Tcells (TFH cells), a rare type of immune cell that is essential for inducing a strong and lasting antibody response to viruses and other microbes, have garnered intense interest in recent years but the ...

Uncovering the secrets of immune system invaders

July 20, 2015

The human immune system is a powerful and wonderful creation. If you cut your skin, your body mobilizes a series of different proteins and cells to heal the cut. If you are infected by a virus or bacteria, your immune system ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.