Pre-op factors predict post-gastric op glycemic response

Pre-op factors predict post-gastric op glycemic response
The glycemic response to gastric bypass surgery can be predicted in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes by three preoperative factors, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Diabetes Care.

(HealthDay)—The glycemic response to gastric bypass surgery can be predicted in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes by three preoperative factors, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Diabetes Care.

John B. Dixon, Ph.D., from the Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues analyzed preoperative details of 154 with to identify clinically meaningful predictors of diabetes remission after gastric . A hemoglobin A1c level of ≤6 percent was used to define remission.

The researchers found that, at 12 months, 69.5 percent of participants achieved remission. The three independent preoperative predictors were: diabetes duration of less than four years, body mass index above 35 kg/m², and fasting C-peptide concentration of more than 2.9 ng/mL. Using two or three of these predictors allowed a sensitivity of 82 percent and specificity of 87 percent for remission. Those cases in which hemoglobin A1c ≤7 percent was not achieved were predicted by duration of diabetes and C-peptide. Remission and less satisfactory outcomes were also predicted by percentage of weight loss after surgery.

"The glycemic response to gastric bypass is related to body mass index, duration of , fasting C-peptide (influenced by insulin resistance and residual β-cell function), and weight loss," the authors write. "These data support and refine previous findings in non-Asian populations. Specific ethnic and procedural regression equations and cutoff points may vary."

Several authors or their institutions disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.

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