Salmonella confirmed in peanut butter plant

October 5, 2012 by Mary Clare Jalonick

(AP)—The Food and Drug Administration says it has found salmonella in a New Mexico plant that produces nut butters for national retailer Trader Joe's and several other grocery chains. The Trader Joe's peanut butter is now linked to 35 salmonella illnesses in 19 states.

The FDA said Friday that Washington state health officials have also confirmed the presence of in a jar of the Trader Joe's peanut butter found in a victim's home.

Sunland Inc. has expanded its recall to include all products manufactured in the plant in the last two and a half years, since March 2010. Whole Foods Market, Target, Safeway and many other national chains have used Sunland products in their own brands.

Almost two-thirds of those sickened are children under the age of 10.

Explore further: Peanut butter recall expands beyond Trader Joe's (Update)

More information: Full list of recalled items: www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/CORENetwork/ucm320413.htm

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