Nestle voluntarily recalls Nesquik

November 8, 2012

(AP)—Nestle USA is recalling some of its Nesquik chocolate powder due to a possible risk of salmonella exposure.

The food maker said Thursday that it is recalling Nesquik sold in its 10.9, 21.8 and 40.7-ounce canisters across the country in early October. The affected products have an expiration date of October 2014.

Nestle says it is issuing the recall after its ingredient supplier decided to recall some of the used in the product due to possible . The company says there are no reported illnesses associated with the product.

Salmonella can cause diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever. It can be life-threatening in infants, the elderly, pregnant women and those with .

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