Smoke-free workplace laws lead to decline in MI incidence

Smoke-free workplace laws lead to decline in MI incidence
Following implementation of workplace smoke-free laws, the incidence of myocardial infarction decreased significantly in Olmsted County, Minn., according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay)—Following implementation of workplace smoke-free laws, the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) decreased significantly in Olmsted County, Minn., according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

To evaluate the population impact of smoke-free laws, Richard D. Hurt, M.D., from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues utilized data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project. The incidence of MI and sudden cardiac death in Olmsted County during the 18-month period before and after implementation of each smoke-free ordinance was assessed.

The researchers found that the incidence of MI declined significantly by 33 percent, from 150.8 to 100.7 per 100,000 population when comparing the 18 months before implementation of the smoke-free restaurant ordinance (implemented in 2002) with the 18 months after implementation of the smoke-free workplace law (implemented in 2007). During the same period, the incidence of decreased by 17 percent (P = 0.13), from 109.1 to 92.0 per 100,000 population. While the prevalence of smoking declined, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity either remained constant or increased during the same period.

"The implementation of smoke-free workplace ordinances was associated with a substantial decrease in MI, the magnitude of which is not explained by concomitant community interventions or changes in , with the exception of smoking prevalence," the authors write. "Exposure to secondhand smoke should be considered a modifiable risk factor for MI."

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study confirms smoke-free workplaces reduce heart attacks

Nov 14, 2011

Mayo Clinic researchers have amassed additional evidence that secondhand smoke kills and smoke-free workplace laws save lives. The study will be presented to the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions on Monday ...

Smoke-free laws have no impact on employee turnover

May 06, 2008

Supporting the argument that smoke-free laws do not damage the hospitality industry, restaurants that ban cigarette smoking haven’t suffered from increased employee turnover, according to a new report published in the current ...

Smoking bans reduce hospitalizations

Oct 29, 2012

(HealthDay)—Bans on smoking in public areas and workplaces have significantly reduced hospitalizations for heart attacks, strokes and asthma around the world, a new study finds.

Recommended for you

Use of drug-eluting stents may cut in-hospital mortality

Nov 20, 2014

(HealthDay)—Use of drug-eluting stents (DES) rather than bare-metal stents (BMS) for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with lower rates of in-hospital mortality, according to research ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.