Health care satisfaction rated as high by unacculturated hispanics

Health care satisfaction rated as high by unacculturated hispanics
Hispanic patients, particularly unacculturated Hispanics, rate their health care experience more highly than do other patient groups, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health.

(HealthDay)—Hispanic patients, particularly unacculturated Hispanics, rate their health care experience more highly than do other patient groups, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health.

Memoona Hasnain, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago, and colleagues surveyed 881 receiving care at four outpatient family medicine clinics. The patients were 34 percent African-American; 31 percent Hispanic-classified as unacculturated or biculturated; 33 percent Caucasian; and 2 percent missing race. To measure experiences of care, the Consumer Assessment of and Systems Clinician & Group (CAG) Survey Adult Primary Care instrument was used. The Short Form-12 survey was used to assess health status.

The researchers found that race and acculturation were significantly associated with several CAG subscales, after adjustment for other variables. Significantly higher ratings for care experiences were given by who also expressed greater interest in shared decision making. The average physician grade was 8.8 from white patients, 9.0 from black patients, 9.1 from biculturated Hispanics, and 9.7 out of 10 from unacculturated Hispanics.

"When you come from another country, you're probably more deferential and you try not to displease people with what you say," Hasnain said in a statement. "While you're not exactly happy with the care you're getting, you'll rate it higher."

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