Understanding of infantile hemangiomas is improving

Understanding of infantile hemangiomas is improving
Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infantile hemangiomas is leading to better treatment options, according to a review published online Dec. 24 in Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infantile hemangiomas (IHs) is leading to better treatment options, according to a review published online Dec. 24 in Pediatrics.

Tina S. Chen, M.D., from Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, and colleagues conducted a literature review to provide an update on the pathogenesis and therapy for IH.

The researchers noted important detrimental associations with IH, such as significant structural anomalies associated with segmental IH. There have been dramatic changes in the standards of care for the evaluation and management of hemangiomas. Long-term sequelae can be minimized or eliminated with timely recognition and therapy. There are new , including oral , which can prevent or minimize or scarring, but the side effect profile and risk-benefit ratio of such interventions must be evaluated before instituting therapy.

"Recent discoveries concerning hemangioma pathogenesis provide both an improved understanding and more optimal approach to work-up and management," the authors write.

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