Low testosterone levels affect total lipid oxidation

December 7, 2012
Low testosterone levels affect total lipid oxidation
Very low testosterone levels impact total lipid oxidation but have no effect on the production of very-low-density lipoprotein-triglycerides, according to a study published online Nov. 27 in Diabetes.

(HealthDay)—Very low testosterone levels impact total lipid oxidation but have no effect on the production of very-low-density lipoprotein-triglycerides (VLDL-TGs), according to a study published online Nov. 27 in Diabetes.

Christian Høst, from the Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues treated 12 healthy young males (mean age, 23.1 years) with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist to induce castration levels of testosterone. Over several days one month later, the men were randomly treated with a gel containing physiological levels of testosterone, supraphysiological levels of testosterone, and placebo as part of a crossover study.

The researchers found that short-term had no effect on the or concentration of VLDL-TGs but was characterized by reduced total lipid oxidation. High physiological testosterone levels increased VLDL-TG secretion under both basal conditions and after application of a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp.

"These data show that testosterone can act through fast non-genomic pathways in the liver," Høst and colleagues conclude. " is not a major determinant of resting VLDL-TG kinetics in men."

The study was funded in part by an unconditional research grant from Ipsen Pharma. Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Overweight men can boost low testosterone levels by losing weight

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Engineered blood vessels grow in lambs

September 27, 2016

In a hopeful development for children born with congenital heart defects, scientists said Tuesday they had built artificial blood vessels which grew unaided when implanted into lambs, right into adulthood.

Vigilin, the lock keeper

September 27, 2016

ETH researchers have discovered a molecule in liver cells that controls the release of fat into the bloodstream. This "lock keeper" is present in large quantities in overweight people and leads indirectly to vascular narrowing.

Fighting the aging process at a cellular level

September 22, 2016

It was about 400 BC when Hippocrates astutely observed that gluttony and early death seemed to go hand in hand. Too much food appeared to 'extinguish' life in much the same way as putting too much wood on a fire smothers ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.