Low testosterone levels affect total lipid oxidation

December 7, 2012
Low testosterone levels affect total lipid oxidation
Very low testosterone levels impact total lipid oxidation but have no effect on the production of very-low-density lipoprotein-triglycerides, according to a study published online Nov. 27 in Diabetes.

(HealthDay)—Very low testosterone levels impact total lipid oxidation but have no effect on the production of very-low-density lipoprotein-triglycerides (VLDL-TGs), according to a study published online Nov. 27 in Diabetes.

Christian Høst, from the Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues treated 12 healthy young males (mean age, 23.1 years) with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist to induce castration levels of testosterone. Over several days one month later, the men were randomly treated with a gel containing physiological levels of testosterone, supraphysiological levels of testosterone, and placebo as part of a crossover study.

The researchers found that short-term had no effect on the or concentration of VLDL-TGs but was characterized by reduced total lipid oxidation. High physiological testosterone levels increased VLDL-TG secretion under both basal conditions and after application of a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp.

"These data show that testosterone can act through fast non-genomic pathways in the liver," Høst and colleagues conclude. " is not a major determinant of resting VLDL-TG kinetics in men."

The study was funded in part by an unconditional research grant from Ipsen Pharma. Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Older age does not cause testosterone levels to decline in healthy men

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Flu study, on hold, yields new vaccine technology

September 2, 2015

Vaccines to protect against an avian influenza pandemic as well as seasonal flu may be mass produced more quickly and efficiently using technology described today by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the ...

We've all got a blind spot, but it can be shrunk

August 31, 2015

You've probably never noticed, but the human eye includes an unavoidable blind spot. That's because the optic nerve that sends visual signals to the brain must pass through the retina, which creates a hole in that light-sensitive ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.