Deep suctioning in bronchitis admission tied to longer stays

Deep suctioning in bronchitis admission tied to longer stays
Deep suctioning used in the first 24 hours after a pediatric admission for bronchitis is associated with increased length of stays, according to a study published online March 4 in JAMA Pediatrics.

(HealthDay)—Deep suctioning used in the first 24 hours after a pediatric admission for bronchitis is associated with increased length of stays (LOS), according to a study published online March 4 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Grant M. Mussman, M.D., from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and colleagues retrospectively studied data from the of 740 infants (aged 2 to 12 months) hospitalized with .

The researchers found that increased deep suction as a percentage of suction events was associated with increased LOS. For patients with no deep suction, the geometric mean of LOS was 1.75 days, compared to 2.35 days in patients with more than 60 percent deep suction. There was also an increased LOS in a dose-dependent manner, with an increased number of suctioning lapses with a geometric mean of 1.62 days in patients with no lapses compared to 2.64 days in patients with three or four lapses.

"For patients admitted with bronchiolitis, the use of deep suctioning in the first 24 hours after admission and lapses greater than four hours between suctioning events were associated with longer LOS," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Glucose levels at admission predict death in pneumonia

May 30, 2012

(HealthDay) -- For patients with community-acquired pneumonia without preexisting diabetes, serum glucose levels at admission are predictive of death at 28 and 90 days, according to a study published online ...

Recommended for you

Want kids to eat better? Get them cooking

Nov 27, 2014

(HealthDay)—Getting kids involved in the kitchen, through cooking classes or at home, may make them more likely to choose healthy foods, according to a recent review.

Life-saving promise in simple steps

Nov 27, 2014

The debate over the best time to clamp a baby's umbilical cord has been around forever. In about 350 BCE, Aristotle, reputedly the world's first genuine scientist, advocated delaying clamping until placenta ...

PCV13 recommended for 6- to 18-year-olds at high risk

Nov 26, 2014

(HealthDay)—Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 (PCV13) should be administered to certain children aged 6 through 18 years who are at high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), according to a policy ...

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.