Acupuncture reduces pain of chronic low back discomfort

April 8, 2013
Acupuncture reduces pain of chronic low back discomfort
Individualized acupuncture treatment reduces some negative symptoms of chronic low back pain better than sham treatment, according to a study published in the April issue of Spine.

(HealthDay)—Individualized acupuncture treatment reduces some negative symptoms of chronic low back pain (cLBP) better than sham treatment, according to a study published in the April issue of Spine.

Yu-Jeong Cho , K.M.D., from Kyung Hee University in Seoul, Republic of Korea, and colleagues randomized 130 patients to receive either individualized real acupuncture treatments or treatments for more than six weeks (twice a week) from Korean medicine doctors. Patients had nonspecific LBP lasting for at least last three months prior to the trial.

The researchers found that from the 116 patients who completed the three- and six-month follow-ups, the only baseline difference between the groups was Oswestry Disability Index scores. At eight weeks, there was a significant difference in visual analogue scale (VAS) score for bothersomeness and score of cLBP between the groups, but both scores improved significantly until the three-month follow-up. Both groups also saw similar improvements in Oswestry Disability Index, the , and Short Form-36 scores.

"This randomized sham-controlled trial suggests that acupuncture treatment shows better effect on the reduction of the bothersomeness and pain intensity than sham control in participants with cLBP," the authors write.

Explore further: Two randomized controlled trials highlight difficulties in treating migraines

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not rated yet Apr 08, 2013
OK BUT does it fix the problem or does it merely mask the symptoms? If acupuncture merely masks symptoms then it may delay necessary or appropriate treatment which could be BAD!
not rated yet Apr 08, 2013
The same way over-the-counter painkillers can be bad. It's a useful tool, especially since lower back pain often has no cure, but it's not a substitute for a doctor.

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