Tomosynthesis increases breast cancer detection rate

2D plus 3D breast imaging increases cancer detection rates by 11%, and could be particularly useful in detecting cancer in women with dense breasts, a new study suggests.

Researchers at Yale University Smilow Cancer Hospital in New Haven, CT, reviewed the of 14,684 patients. Forty-two cancers were found in 8,769 patients who had only 2D imaging (a cancer detection rate of 4.8 per 1,000), said Dr. Jaime Geisel, a lead author of the study. Thirty-two cancers were found in the group that had 2D plus 3D (tomosynthesis) imaging, for a cancer detection rate of 5.4 per 1,000, said Dr. Geisel. The percent of invasive and intraductal cancers detected among the two groups was similar, she said.

In addition to the improved rate, "of the patients who had cancer detected with 3D, 54% had . Of the patients who had cancer detected with 2D only, 21% had dense breasts. This suggests better performance of the 3D in dense breast tissue given 3D was offered to patients regardless of or risk factors," Dr. Geisel said.

Dr. Geisel noted that the majority of screening mammograms at her facility now includes 3D imaging.

"I am hopeful that my study will help raise awareness among physicians as well as women undergoing ," she said. Additional research needs to be done; "We recognize the numbers are still too small to draw significant conclusions, but the data is compelling," she said.

Dr. Geisel will present her study at the ARRS annual meeting on April 19 in Washington, DC.

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