Coordinated approach needed to protect from arsenic exposure

May 2, 2013
Coordinated approach needed to protect from arsenic exposure
A coordinated approach is necessary for monitoring and regulating the arsenic content of foods, according to a viewpoint piece published online April 29 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay)—A coordinated approach is necessary for monitoring and regulating the arsenic content of foods, according to a viewpoint piece published online April 29 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Ana Navas-Acien, M.D., Ph.D., from the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, and Keeve E. Nachman, Ph.D., M.H.S., from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine—both in Baltimore, discuss the presence of arsenic in foods, specifically rice, , and chicken.

The authors note that there are currently few federal efforts to characterize the arsenic content and species in foods. In response to recent , the U.S. has initiated focused analyses of arsenic in specific foods. Arsenic monitoring data should be collected and standards developed for specific foods. Physicians should notify their patients about sources of and strategies for prevention. In cases of concern, urine total arsenic can be measured as a marker of exposure. In addition, regulatory agencies, , and legislative bodies have roles to play in reducing exposure. For example, FDA standards could help ensure the safety of food products. Given the insufficient evidence relating to arsenic-based drugs in animal production, the FDA should also consider limiting or banning their use. Federal or state legislation addressing dietary arsenic should also be considered.

"Protecting the public from exposure to dietary arsenic requires many coordinated measures," the authors write. "Raising public awareness is a first step toward long-term solutions that prevent dietary arsenic exposure."

Explore further: What you eat can prevent arsenic overload

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

What you eat can prevent arsenic overload

June 28, 2012

Millions of people worldwide are exposed to arsenic from contaminated water, and we are all exposed to arsenic via the food we eat. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Nutrition Journal has demonstrated ...

Recommended for you

Bright lighting encourages healthy food choices

May 26, 2016

Dining in dimly lit restaurants has been linked to eating slowly and ultimately eating less than in brighter restaurants, but does lighting also impact how healthfully we order?

Big Data can save lives, says leading cancer expert

May 16, 2016

The sharing of genetic information from millions of cancer patients around the world could be key to revolutionising cancer prevention and care, according to a leading cancer expert from Queen's University Belfast.

New soap to ward off malaria carrying mosquitoes

May 13, 2016

(Medical Xpress)—Gérard Niyondiko along with colleagues Frank Langevin and Lisa Barutel has posted a project on the crowd source funding site ulule for a product called Faso Soap. They claim the soap can cut in half the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.