New FDA survey to assess doc attitudes on DTC advertising

New FDA survey to assess doc attitudes on DTC advertising
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration plans to conduct a new survey involving 2,000 health care professionals to examine their views on direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription medications. The survey has been approved by the White House Office of Management and Budget.

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration plans to conduct a new survey involving 2,000 health care professionals to examine their views on direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of prescription medications. The survey has been approved by the White House Office of Management and Budget.

A recent survey, conducted by CMI/Compass and involving 140 physicians, indicates that approximately 70 percent of doctors believe DTC advertising should be scaled back or eliminated. However, 48 percent of physicians agree or somewhat agree that DTC advertising informs, educates, and empowers patients; 68 percent agree or somewhat agree that DTC advertising encourages patients to contact a doctor. Furthermore, 52 percent of doctors believe DTC advertising removes the stigma linked with certain conditions.

The FDA survey will be conducted among 2,000 , including 500 , 500 specialists, 500 , and 500 physician assistants. Due to inclusion of non-physicians, the outcome is likely to vary, but the survey will not be completed until March 2015.

Based on the CMI/Compass survey, "65 percent says DTC ads lead to inappropriate prescribing; 51 percent agree the ads waste appointment time; 65 [percent] believe DTC advertising is not 'rigorously regulated;' and 78 [percent] agree that DTC advertising, ultimately, increases the cost of health care."

More information: More Information

Related Stories

US Internet ad revenue grows 15 percent in 2012

date Apr 16, 2013

U.S. Internet advertising revenue grew 15 percent to a record $36.6 billion in 2012, with mobile ad revenue growing faster than other types, according to a new report Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Breastfeeding protects against environmental pollution

date May 22, 2015

Living in a city with a high level of vehicle traffic or close to a steel works means living with two intense sources of environmental pollution. However, a study conducted by the UPV/EHU researcher Aitana ...

When it comes to hearing, diet may trump noise exposure

date May 22, 2015

Although the old wives' tale about carrots being good for your eyesight has been debunked, University of Florida researchers have found a link between healthy eating and another of your five senses: hearing.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.