Study finds gender, employment status and social conditions key factors in development of mental disorders

Being a woman, unemployed and living in a situation of social adversity are the three strongest trigger influences in subjects with a genetic predisposition to mental disorder. Moreover, in Andalusia, over 20% of the population present a mental disorder at some time in their lives. The most frequent disorders are the least serious—like depression, the most frequent disorder in 12% of the population, and anxiety disorders, present in nearly 10%. In contrast, nearly 3% suffer from psychotic disorders, the most severe form of mental illness.

These are some conclusions from the PISMA-ep study—to date, the largest epidemiologic study conducted in in order to accurately determine both the principle (genetic and environmental) causes and the prevalence of in the region. The project is led by Jorge Cervilla of the University of Granada Department of Psychiatry, in collaboration with the University Hospital (Hospital Universitario San Cecilio), the Andalusian School of Public Health (Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública) and the Mental Health Program of the Andalusian Health Sevice (Servicio Andaluz de Salud).

The researchers have just completed the —the first results of which are already known—and this will serve to improve the definitive study method and make an initial estimate of disorder frequency. The study has produced results similar to those obtained in other large-scale studies conducted in the European Union.

Survey of 4500 Andalusian households

A few days ago, the PISMA-ep study began sampling. This involves a survey of a wide-ranging representative sample of the Andalusian population to collect data on the diagnosis of mental disorders and the identification of their causes. During the next three months, interviewers, accredited as field researchers employed by the Granada-based "Grupo Ítem" market research company, will visit nearly 4500 households across Andalusia.

"These data, together with those obtained from the definitive study that has begun simultaneously in all the Andalusian provinces, will be of great use in helping identify people at greater risk of suffering the onset of a mental disorder or of having a relapse," explains Jorge Cervilla. Clinical intervention at the right moment "can be the key to prevent someone from falling ill, or to make the episode less severe."

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Psychologist finds link between PTSD and prison

date 2 hours ago

Americans who spend time in prison are nearly twice as likely to suffer post-traumatic stress disorder than those who don't, according to a new study by UWM psychology professor Shawn Cahill and his graduate ...

The new normal? Addressing gun violence in America

date 21 hours ago

Article Spotlight features summaries written in collaboration with authors of recently published articles by the Journals Program of the American Psychological Association. The articles are nominated by the editors as noteworthy ...

Demi Lovato gets vocal about mental illness

date May 28, 2015

(HealthDay)—Demi Lovato huddled in the back of her tour bus, eyes wet with tears as she watched a horde of fans streaming into the venue where she was about to play.

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.