Kidney disease in Canada: 12.5 percent of adults afflicted, yet many unaware

May 6, 2013

An estimated 12.5% of Canadians in Canada have evidence of chronic kidney disease, including people without risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes, according to a study published in CMAJ.

Chronic kidney disease is a risk factor for death, and it places a significant burden on the health care system; dialysis for 1 person alone over 1 year costs about $60 000.

Estimates of kidney disease in Canada are based on extrapolations of the prevalence of end-stage renal disease. In this study, researchers looked at blood and urine samples from 3689 participants in the Canadian Survey aged 18–79 years from across Canada to generate a national estimate of chronic kidney disease. Kidney disease (all stages) was present in 12.5% or 2.9 million Canadian adults during the study period from 2007 to 2009. and diabetes were more common in people with chronic kidney disease than without (25% v.15% for high blood pressure and 11% v. 5.4% for diabetes). However, 72% of adults with chronic kidney disease had neither condition.

Prevalence rates are similar to US rates, although higher than in Europe and Australia.

Awareness of kidney dysfunction was low, with only 5.3% of adults with any stage of chronic kidney disease having been diagnosed and only 12% of people with later stage kidney disease knowing they were ill.

Screening for kidney disease in people with hypertension, diabetes and other is recommended by some associations, but it is not cost effective for the general population, seniors and people with hypertension.

"Because most of these people did not have diabetes or hypertension, conditions most likely to prompt screening for , they may be easily missed based on current practices. A comprehensive, evidence-based Canadian guideline for screening adults for chronic kidney disease would be useful to optimize early intervention and of and its associated outcomes," the authors conclude.

More information: www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.120833

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies

July 28, 2015

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. ...

Can social isolation fuel epidemics?

July 21, 2015

Conventional wisdom has it that the more people stay within their own social groups and avoid others, the less likely it is small disease outbreaks turn into full-blown epidemics. But the conventional wisdom is wrong, according ...

Lack of knowledge on animal disease leaves humans at risk

July 20, 2015

Researchers from the University of Sydney have painted the most detailed picture to date of major infectious diseases shared between wildlife and livestock, and found a huge gap in knowledge about diseases which could spread ...

IBD genetically similar in Europeans and non-Europeans

July 20, 2015

The first genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to include individuals from diverse populations has shown that the regions of the genome underlying the disease are consistent around the world. This study, conducted ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.